Dated Placenames from Lincolnshire: D-G

by Gunnvör silfrahárr (Christie L. Ward) and Talan Gwynek (Brian M. Scott)

© 2004 Christie L. Ward; all rights reserved

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D

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Some Early Spellings Date Etymology Modern Name
Dentune1086"Valley settlement", from OE denu "a valley" and tûn "settlement, farm, village".Denton
Dodinctone1086Either "estate called after Dudda", from the OE masculine name Dudda, a suffix -ing, and tûn "settlement, farm, village", or "estate on a rounded hill", from OE *dodding "(place on) a rounded hill" and tûn; the village does lie on a low, circular hill.Doddington
Dodintune
Dry Dodyngton
1086
1325
The early forms of Doddington show that it originally existed in two forms. One is "Duda's estate", from Dudan, gen. sing. of the OE masculine name Duda, and tûn "settlement, farm, village"; the other is "estate called after Duda", from the name Duda, a suffix -ing, and tûn. The affix is Middle English dry "dry", found already in Dry Dodyngton 1325.Dry Doddington
Dusebi1086"Dúsi's village or farm", from Dúsa, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Dúsi, and "a farmstead, a village".Dowsby
Dunesbi1086Probably "Duni's village or farm", from Dunes, gen. sing. of the OE masculine name Duni, and ON "a farmstead, a village", but given the local topography, the first element could be dûnes, gen. sing. of OE dûn "a hill".Dunsby
Dvninctune1086"Settlement called Duning" or "settlement at Duning". Duning is from OE *dûning "(place at) the high ground", a derivative of dûn "a hill"; the second element is tûn "settlement, farm, village".Donington
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E

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Some Early Spellings Date Etymology Modern Name
Edeneham1086"Êada's homestead", from Êadan, gen. sing. of the OE masculine name Êada, and hâm "homestead, village, estate".Edenham
Ellingetone
Edlingtuna
1086
1115
"The estate called after Êdla or Êadulf", from one of the OE masculine names *Êdla and Êadulf, both shortened from Êadwulf, the suffix -ing, and tûn "settlement, farm, village".Edlington
Estdepinge
Deping Sancti Jacobi
1086
ca. 1221
"The deep place, the deep fen", from OE *dêoping, a derivative of dêop "deep". Nearby is West Deeping (West Depinge 1086).Deeping St. James
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F

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Some Early Spellings Date Etymology Modern Name
Fentun1212"Marsh settlement", from OE fenn "a marsh, a fen" and tûn "settlement, farm, village".Fenton
Figelingeham1086The first element is from *Fyglinga, gen. pl. of *Fyglingas "the people called after Fygela", which is derived from the OE masculine name Fygela or Fygla; the second is OE hâm "homestead, village, estate", so the whole is "homestead or village of the Fyglingas, the people called after Fygela". It's possible that there was a variant with first element *Fyglinge, an inflected form of *Fygling "the place called after Fygela".Fillingham
Fleot1086From OE flêot "an estuary, an inlet, a creek; a river, a stretch of river (sometimes implying fishing rights). The village was once at the head of an arm of the sea, which suits the "inlet" sense, but in addition it is recorded in Domesday Book as having a fishery, so the name may in this case have had the technical sense "stretch of river with fishing rights".Fleet
Flichesburg1086"Flík's or Flikkr's fortified place", from Flíks, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Flík, or Flikks, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Flikkr, and OE burh "fortified place".Flixborough
Folchingeham1086The first element is from *Folcinga, gen. pl. of *Folkingas "the people called after Folca", which is derived from the OE masculine name *Folca; the second is OE hâm "homestead, village, estate", so the whole is "village or homestead of the Folcingas, the people called after Folca".Folkingham (also Falkingham)
Fotesdic1183"Fótr's ditch", from Fóts, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Fótr, and ON dík "a ditch" (or OE dîc "a ditch", with pronunciation influenced by the ON word).Fosdyke
Foztun1086"Fótr's farm or village", from Fóts, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Fótr, and OE tûn "settlement, farm, village"; it's likely that the first element was originally an OE personal name that was changed when the settlement was taken over by the Danes.Foston
Franetone1086"Fráni's, Franki's, or Frameca's farm or village". The first element is from *Frána, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name *Fráni, from Franka, gen. sing. of the ODan masculine name Franki, or from *Framecan, gen. sing. of the OE masculine diminutive *Frameca; the second is from OE tûn "settlement, farm, village".Frampton
Frischenei1086Possibly from OE (æt ære) frescan îe "(at the) freshwater stream", from a metathesized form of fersc "fresh, not salt" and êa "a river, a stream", but most of the early forms point rather towards OE êg "an island" as the second element.Friskney
Fugelestou1086"The meeting-place of the birds", from fugla, gen. pl. of OE fugol "a bird", and stôw "a place, a meeting-place, a holy place".Fulstow
Fulebec
Fulebroc
1086
1194
"The dirty stream", from fûla, an inflected form of OE fûl "foul, dirty" and ON bekkr "a stream"; there is some evidence (an isolated form Fulebroc 1194) that bekkr replaced an OE brôc "a brook, a stream".Fulbeck
Fulnedebi1086The second element is ON "a farmstead, a village"; the first is uncertain. It may be from *Fulcnôðes, gen. sing. of an OE masculine name *Folcnôð, or from *full-nauts, gen. sing. of an ON *full-nautr "one who has a full share" used as a byname.Fulnetby
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G

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Some Early Spellings Date Etymology Modern Name
Gainesburg1086"Gegn's fortified place", from Gegnes, gen. sing. of the OE masculine name Gegn, and burh "fortified place". The initial G- instead of the expected Y- is the result of ON influence.Gainsborough
Gereburg1086"The earth fortification", from the OE compound eorð-burh "earth fortification", derived from eorðe "earth, soil, ground" and burh "a fortification".Yarburgh (Yarborough)
Gerneham1086The second element is from OE hâm "homestead, village, settlement", but the first is very uncertain; an otherwise unrecorded river-name *Gerne and an OE masculine name *Georna (in the gen. sing. *Geornan) have been suggested as possibilities. The first would make it "homestead on the (stream called) Gerne"; the second, "Georna's homestead".Irnham
Gerulftorp1086"Gerulf's outlying settlement". The masculine name Gerulf is either from ON Geirúlfr or from Continental Germanic Gairulf; the second element is ON or OE þorp "outlying farm or hamlet".Garthorpe
Glentewrde1086"Enclosure at Glente", from OE *glente and worð "enclosure". *Glente is probably "look-out hill", though a case can also be made for the sense "a hawk"; Glentworth lies at the western edge of a ridge that offers good views to both east and west and for that reason may have been called *Glente "look-out ridge" in OE.Glentworth
Golse
Goulsele
1086
1212
"(Place at) the gusher, the gushing spring", from *gausli, dat. sing. of ON *geysill "a gusher, a gushing spring", a derivative of ON geysa "to send out with violence, to gush". There are several place-names in which original [z] (the sound of the s in gausli) or [ts] has become modern [ks], spelled x.Goxhill
Gosebertechirche
Gosburton
Gosberton
1086
1487
1510
Originally "Gosbert's church", from the CG masculine name Gosbert, Gauzbert and ON kirkja "a church", the latter possibly replacing OE cirice "a church". In the late 15th c. and early 16th c. the second element, variously spelled -kirk(e), -kyrk(e), -chirch(e) was replaced by -ton, the earliest example being Gosburton 1487; this name was probably interpreted as "goose Burton", as if from gôsa, gen. pl. of OE gôs "a goose", and burh-tûn "fortified enclosure, a farm or village by a fort", i.e., a burh-tûn where geese were kept.Gosberton
Graingeham1086The second element is OE hâm "homestead, village, estate". The first is uncertain, but it seems to go back to an OE masculine name *Græg or *Græga, either by way of *Græginga, gen. pl. of *Grægingas "people called after Græg(a)" or by way of *Græginge, dative of *Græging "place called after Græg(a)". If so, the name is "homestead or village of the Grægingas" or "homestead at or called after Græging".Grayingham
Grantham1086"Homestead on the sand", from OE *grand "sand" and hâm "homestead, village, estate"; the soil is somewhat sandy.Grantham
Greteford1086"The gravelly ford", from OE grêot "gravel" and ford "a ford"; the soil here is loam over gravel.Greatford (also Gretford)
Grimesbi1086"Grímr's village or farm", from Gríms, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Grímr, and "a farmstead, a village". (The affix Great is apparently no longer used.) Folklore has it that the town is named after Grim, a local fisherman who rescued an infant from a boat he found drifting. He adopted the boy, named him Habloc and raised him. The lad turned out to be the son of the King of Denmark. The boy was returned to his royal family, Grim was rewarded with gold and many fine gifts. Grim returned to Lincolnshire and built the town which he named after himself. The ancient seal of Grimsby contains the names Gryme and Habloc. It is from Habloc that the medieval Havelock the Dane derives.Great Grimsby
Guldelsmere
Ingoldesmeles
1086
12th c.
"Ingiald's sand-banks", from Ingialds, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Ingialdr, and melr "a sand-bank". The first element is more specifically from the OEScand form Ingæld, though some early spellings show confusion with the ON masculine name Ingólfr. The citations show only an English plural in -es for the second element, not the ON plural melar. The Domesday Book citation is actually in Guldelsmere, the first syllable having been interpreted as the preposition in and the second element confused with OE, ME mere "a pond.Ingoldmells
Gunelby
Gvnnebi
1066-1069
1086
"Gunni's farm or village", from Gunna, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Gunni, and "a farmstead, a village".Gunby
Gunfordebi
Gunwarbie Magna
1086
1623
"Gunnfrøðr's farm or village", from Gunnfrøðs, gen. sing. of the ON masculine name Gunnfrøðr, and "a farmstead, a village"; the earliest citation with an affix is Gunwarbie Magna 1623.Great Gonerby

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